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  • 304 Intake Manifold Schematic

    I just bought a 76 CJ7 for my Son's first car. Took it to smog test, and the guy failed it because he couldnt get an idle speed drop from the EGR valve. I took it home and tested everything. The EGR channel is clogged somewhere inside the Intake manifold. I took the few wires and hoses loose and lifted the Intake manifold. Cleaned tons of crud off the valley pan, and found more of the same under it(makes me wonder what's in the bottom of my oil pan).

    Here is the problem. There is a louvered pan of some kind attached to the bottom of the intake manifold. There is more crud inside it. I'm unsure how to get it loose. It seems to be held on by rivets or studs of some kind with round tops. I don't want to proceed unarmed, information-wise. How does this pan come loose? And what will I have to do to re-install it? As it is, I have to find a tol store that carries a big enough hex tool to get the plug out of the rear of the manifold so I can get into and clean out my original objective--the EGR channel.

    Anyone been there, done this?

  • #2
    have you tried compressed air?

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    • #3
      That would blow some of it out. Talked to a local mechanic. He says the pan is held on by rivet pins (I don't know what they are officialy called). They are one-time use, and he suggested I go get the whole manifold boiled. That would mean removing the carb., and all the other stuff I left on.

      I'll probably just coat hanger out what I can, take the plug out of the EGR channel, and open it up, then slap it all back together, get it smogged, and when the kid isn't using it start tracking down some of the leaks underneath. I suspect most of them are seals.

      Based on what I saw under the intake manifold, the oil pan must have at least an inch of crud in it, and the pick-up screenmust be half clogged. When I do that, I may as well do the rear seal, and work my way back from there.

      I will work off your suggestion, Fubar, and get my garage wired for 220 so I can start using the huge air compressor a friend dropped off at my house about 10 years ago. Wifey isn't gonna like my investing in air tools (but I will).

      Hmmm. 220. Welder? Hmmm.

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      • #4
        getting it dipped will also work.

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        • #5
          When I rebuilt my first 350 I removed the rivet pins from the heat shield on the underside of the intake. When I put it all back together I used pop rivets to secure it. The thing is still running around with those rivets in it and I built it about 10 years ago.

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          • #6
            Depending upon how much you want to invest, Edelbrock makes an aluminum intake with provisions for mounting the EGR valve. http://www.edelbrock.com/automotive_...amc_perf.shtml

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            • #7
              V8 304 Manifold pan.

              http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b2...7/S4010006.jpg

              Here is what mine looked like when I put it in. the pan is placed in the manifold and around the exhaust ports I put the black gasket maker. then when I put the manifold on, the manifold bolts hold the pan into place.

              From what I've been told, it helps to keep the temperature correct between the manifold and the oil. I'm not too sure why it is there, but I was helped out when I put my engine together, and this was what i was told.

              Good luck with yours.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bigdaddy

                From what I've been told, it helps to keep the temperature correct between the manifold and the oil. I'm not too sure why it is there, but I was helped out when I put my engine together, and this was what i was told.

                Good luck with yours.
                I believe those are called 'lifter valley oil baffles'. They help to prevent hot oil from splashing on the bottom of the intake manifold, which in turn will keep the fuel/air charge cooler, thus denser. Denser = more power. In addition, you can paint the bottom of the intake white to help reflect heat and put a phenolic spacer under the carb to insulate it from thermal transfer.

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                • #9
                  Exhaust
                  Gas
                  Recirclulator(sp)

                  It takes the exhaust gas and redirects it to the intake when the vehicle is cold thus helping with the mixture a bit, plus it is supposed to do the enviroment or something like that.
                  It can be a beast to get one of those clean. You might want to either replace or get it tanked. Are you useing 10-40?
                  I have seen some real messes from that stuff in an engine.

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