Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Thinking about lifting my CJ7.. Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Thinking about lifting my CJ7..

    I know I shouldn't have to ask something like this, especially considering my profession, but what exactly is the shopping list for doing a 3" suspension lift? Obviously there's springs, shackles, shocks, and dropped pitman arm that come with (or strongly recommended with) most of the kits I've looked over.

    Do I need to worry about the length of the brake lines and sway bar links as well? I'm assuming the stock driveshafts can handle it and the U joints won't be at too extreme an angle, but if I'm wrong or there's something else I hadn't considered please feel free to point it out. I'd like to minimize my trips to and from the parts store lol.

  • #2
    With three inches of lift you will very likely run into problems with the length of the stock brake lines, so longer brake lines are a must. Sway bar links might be included in the lift kit and if not you should get some. With 3 inches of lift you might wanna check the rear driveshaft angle and in case it's borderline rather use chims to correct it. The u-joints lifespan depends on the whole setup; tires, engine, driving style, vehicle use...

    Comment


    • #3
      If you can buy a kit, Every thing you need, except courage and tools, should be in the kit.

      Comment


      • #4
        Don't do it. Lifts are expensive. You may end up spending five figures for all the stuff you need, once you get started. Do heroin instead. Much cheaper.

        Comment


        • #5
          I turn wrenches for a living, so tools I have and there isn't much on the Jeep that scares me. Hell, it looks downright friendly compared to that Volkswagon I have torn apart in my bay right now. I just don't wanna get everything torn apart then figure out the hard way what I should have bought ahead of time. Far as the rest of the setup, I'm thinkin about bumping it up from 31/10.5/15 to 33/10.5/15. Engine is the original 258 coupled to the original 176 transmission, and I do kinda baby it because it's got 150k+ (likely hard) miles. It'll mostly see road use with a little bit of light off road duty once or twice a month. Maybe driving along one of the local beaches, or some entry level off road type stuff. I don't plan on whipping it too hard.

          Alas, I fear it's also far too late to start doing heroin. I already spent the funds I could've used to push start that habit to procure the CJ...Maybe I can pick up the heroin after the Jeep is situated so I can take my mind off how much money I've sunk into it.
          Last edited by Marshal; 04-24-2012, 07:28 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            if you get a decent kit it'll have the wedges on the springs already to align the driveshafts, and they are long enough, just barely, with a 4 inch lift my rear driveshaft would limit droop in the rear end and twisted on me before i replaced it, front shaft was fine lengthwise, although CJ front shafts are terribly weak, I've twisted and/or broken a number of them, on stock springs too.
            The drop pitman is a must to stop bump steer. The pitman arm can be a real PIA to get off, i used heat on the old arm, a good pitman arm puller, and a dead blow hammer to get mine to come off. You can put the springs on easily with a deadman and a tranny lack, just make sure to hit everything with some penetrating oil.
            The brake lines will be long enough to drive around on the street but not the trail, you will have to let the front lines loose in one spot if i remember correctly. There are GM rubber lines that will fit it perfectly, much better than dealing with the stainless steel stuff, I wish I'd done that on mine. You can find the right ones with a google search. It seems everyone ends up using locking pliers to take the brake lines loose as they will be on there tight after so many years. Remember to tighten them a little to break to hold first but go straight to the locking pliers if it slips once.
            I did my lift while working at a Toyota dealership. I did the springs one day after work, then the pitman arm and brake lines the next.

            Comment


            • #7
              I'll probably spend a weekend at work trying to knock it out, once I settle on a kit and get all the parts in. I'll have to look into the GM lines you sugested, that route sounds preferable to steel lines.

              Comment


              • #8
                With creativity, all the stock brake lines work with a 4" lift. I have revolver shackles in the rear with a 4" BDS lift and the stock rear brake hose. The front brake lines can be re-routed and reused too. I have write ups on the mods to make it work. I'll post the links. If you are going with a 3" lift, a drop arm is not needed, the steering link will be lower than the drag link (I did that on my 3" lift and it hampered the steering) On the 4" lift, you should use one. It will put the links in line again. You will want to get the MORE or Big Daddy steering box bracket, with the drop arm, lift, bigger tires etc, the box works over the stock brackets and will brake off the frame. If you have drive shaft issues there are cheap fixes for that too.

                Here's my write up on re-routing the stock front brake lines for max flex:

                http://stagger4x4.com/forum/index.ph...08.0;topicseen
                Last edited by highlandercj-7; 05-03-2012, 09:46 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I went 1.5" and it was more than enough.....

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X