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  • Bleeding brakes

    Looks like I am going to have to bleed my brakes this weekend. Hoping somebody can shed some light on the difficulty of this task. I have never done this before and am wondering if a novice with tools can do this or not. Any helpfull hints/trade secrets would be helpful as well.

    Thanks

  • #2
    not hard to do just takes time get some thing like this makes it a lot easer to do by your self - start at the back pass side wheel - then the back driver wheel -then the front pass side - then last the front driver side

    http://www.partsamerica.com/ProductD...tnumber=648591
    Last edited by fuzz401; 09-06-2005, 02:17 PM.

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    • #3
      Hummmm, I read that U do the front passenger side first then the drivers side then the back passenger side then the back drivers side.

      I know it sounds back words but I'll have to find the article, I think it came out of a rebuilders book. Something to do w/setting the porportioning valve correctly or something.

      RollBar

      P.S. If anyone can find out please post.

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      • #4
        I've always heard it to be the brake furthest from the valve goes first. Maybe there is a difference that i dont know about. I've always done it that way with no problems.

        It makes it alot easier if you have somebody pumping the brakes for you. Have them pump the brake until there is pressure then they hold down the brake. Then you open the valve and let the air bubbles out. Just repeat the process until nothing but fluid comes out then go to the next brake. Make sure the resevoir has plenty of fluid during this process or you get to do it all again. Very easy. Have fun.

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        • #5
          i dont know that doing the front first or the back first really matters. if it has a duel resavour brake box (could'nt think of the right word) they should be independent

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          • #6
            Ya Tom, I've alway's done it the regular way also, I'll have to fine the article again. Something to do w/seting the valve for the proper brake application to stop the Jeep.
            I'll look for it.

            RollBar

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            • #7
              It makes it alot easier if you have somebody pumping the brakes for you. Have them pump the brake until there is pressure then they hold down the brake. Then you open the valve and let the air bubbles out. Just repeat the process until nothing but fluid comes out then go to the next brake. Make sure the resevoir has plenty of fluid during this process or you get to do it all again. Very easy. Have fun.
              with this you do not need another person

              http://www.partsamerica.com/ProductD...tnumber=648591

              there is a tool that is to be used for the portion valve I have never used it in the 26 years that I have had my jeep and always done the brakes the way I stated and never had a problem
              Last edited by fuzz401; 09-07-2005, 11:18 AM.

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              • #8
                Another note for you, never push the fluid back towards the master cyl.
                For example, compressing the caliper with the bleeder closed, that can push contaminents into you master cyl.

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                • #9
                  Just Did Mine

                  Just finished bleeding mine, like Fuzz401 says, I used a vacuum device and started at the farthest wheel. Worked like a champ on my 80 CJ7, nice tight pedal. The FSM did mention other procedures (like holding the proportioning valve some way) for different types of proportioning valves, but I just tried the Fuzz way and it worked great.

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                  • #10
                    the way some valves are designed they could trap air bubbles in them that will not bleed out. usually, those style valves also have bleeders built into them.

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                    • #11
                      bleeder screws

                      Use a flare nut wrench so you don't round off the bleeder screws.They round off very easily with regular wrenches.

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                      • #12
                        Good Grief!

                        Originally posted by Joltz
                        Just finished bleeding mine, like Fuzz401 says, I used a vacuum device and started at the farthest wheel. Worked like a champ on my 80 CJ7, nice tight pedal. The FSM did mention other procedures (like holding the proportioning valve some way) for different types of proportioning valves, but I just tried the Fuzz way and it worked great.

                        Just do it like FUZZ said on the first post. If you're all by yourself do it like he said in his second post.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Sylvatus
                          Another note for you, never push the fluid back towards the master cyl.
                          For example, compressing the caliper with the bleeder closed, that can push contaminents into you master cyl.

                          well, i do that every time i change pads. you have to compress the caliper to fit the new pads in. i've never even heard of anyone doing it with the bleeder open. i always just take the cap off the master cylinder and let it fill back up.

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