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  • Brake Pedal Feel

    I have installed the following on my 90 YJ:
    master cylinder
    both front calipers
    rear wheel cylinders
    rear brakes adjusted

    The Jeep stops great and the rears will lock, but I don't have as firm of a pedal as my 95 has. I may not have even noticed if I weren't able to do a direct comparison with my 95. Is there anything else I should look for to get a firmer pedal. It doesn't feel spongy, it just travels a little more than I would expect. I was wondering about the proportioning valve. Any one have the symptoms of a bad one? Thanks for the input.

  • #2
    You may need to adjust the acorn nut in the booster out a turn or two. Since all MC are not created equal, the new one may have a bit more pretravel.

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    • #3
      I messed around with that. It does help, but when I get it to where it feels good, the rears will lock up quickly on dry pavement if I get on it at all.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by GDJeep
        I messed around with that. It does help, but when I get it to where it feels good, the rears will lock up quickly on dry pavement if I get on it at all.
        I am a dummy on this but can you change the bias between front and back with an adjustment on the proportioning valve? How do I adjust the booster?? I have a weak pedal that is fully bled and new lines and braided ends.

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        • #5
          I don't think the proportioning valve is adjustable, but if it is, someone let me know. The nut I was talking about is on the actuator rod that comes out of the booster and makes contact with the master cylinder piston. If you take the m/c off (no need to disconnect hydr. lines) you will see it. You can turn it so the rod becomes longer. Doing so will give you a firmer pedal.

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          • #6
            Rebleed?

            I know this is obvious but-I put line extensions on when I lifted mine and I had a softer feel as well, I bled and rebled them and it helped. maybe that will help.

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            • #7
              The proportioning valve is not adjustable. However, you might want to try bleeding the prop valve. It's usually not necessary when you do an all line bleed, but at times does help. On the front of the valve there is usually a boot, remove it. Various years used different sizes, but try a 3/4" box wrench on the plug you just took the boot off of.

              Have someone pump the brakes up and hold them, then slowly loosen the plug. It might take a turn or two, but fluid should come out. Stop when the fluid flows and tighten back up when the brake pedal is to the floor. When tightening up, watch the 'O' ring around the plug that it doesn't bulge anywhere and get pinched. If it does, you'll need to replace it as the plug will leak without it.

              Do this at least twice.

              Hope this make a difference for you.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the tip. I'll give it a try. I know exactly what you're talking about on the valve. I wondered if that could be bled.

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                • #9
                  The other thing that I noticed is that one of your jeep's has braided braklines and the other does not. That may give you a diference in pedal feel as the stock rubber line's will expand slightly under braking pressure.

                  Good luck

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                  • #10
                    O.K., any other thoughts?

                    So I played around with the brakes more this afternoon. I cracked the nut on the front of the proportioning valve and while I didn't get any fluid out of the nipple, I could get it to come out of the threads on the nut. Bled this several times and re-bled all 4 brakes again. Didn't notice any difference (bummer). No air in the lines either. After thinking about it and driving it again, the best way to describe the feeling is a lack of a progressive pedal feel. Meaning there isn't much between a little brake to slow gradually and full on hit 'em hard. You really have to concentrate to brake smoothly (modulate) without having the front end dive. I have the rod coming out of the booster adjusted further out than I feel is necessary, so I guess the next thing to replace is the proportioning valve itself. Any other tip/thoughts before I do? Neon Ryder- I thought about the difference between stainless lines vs. rubber, but then the progressiveness of the pedal hit me as a better way to describe it. Thanks for your help. Keep the ideas coming.

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