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  • Towing an RV trailer

    I will be purchasing a trailer soon and want opinions on size/towability. DC says that I could tow 5000lbs. The length of trailer is what makes me nervous though. What experiences have others had. Thanks.

  • #2
    Well, the length of a trailer isn't a problem, just needs some feeling for the measuments and the handling but both you can learn and train.

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    • #3
      Length matters. At least that's what the girls say behind our backs. Seriously though, the length of the trailer does come into play. The phrase "the tail wagging the dog" applies here. Do you plan on using a load leveling hitch? How heavy is the trailer, and does it have electric brakes? What is the tongue weight? More info please.

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      • #4
        Length and heft matter. My GC has airbag helpers to allow towing of a trailer. The length does make a diff when the trailer is longer than your wheelbase. My wifes horse trailer blows the GC all over the road. Power wise the 318 pulls it jsut fine but the wind makes handling a bit tricky.
        Definately get a brake controller installed to help ease the load on the brakes inthe GC though.

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        • #5
          Since I tow about 2000 trailers a year, literally, you should not be concerned too much about the length, unless you forget its behind you when you turn. I teach classes to new boat owners on how to trailer their boats. If your trailer is properly balanced, about 10 percent of the total weight of the unit should be on the tongue, meaning if the entire trailer and contents weigh 4000 lbs you should have 400 pounds of tongue weight on your ball. Anti-sway bars do help on longer trailers mostly but they should not be needed if the setup is proper. If you have trailer sway going down the road you most likely do not have the proper weight distribution. Of course their are trailers that just act like sails and you cant do too much about that. Hydraulic surge brakes work great if everything is properly maintained and it negates the need for an electric brake controller to be hooked up. Also, load levelers on the towing vehicle do help with heavier loads, and believe it or not they do help reduce trailer sway also. I have customers with 25 foot boats towing behind grand cherokees with not a problem. Hope this helps.

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          • #6
            Length can matter. If it's long enough, you might want to get an anti-sway bar installed.

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            • #7
              Wow you must put a ton of miles on your grand towing 2000 trailers a year.
              Thats 5.4 trailers a day! Are you typing from your vehicle? Thats as dangerous as putting on lipstick or reading while you drive those 2000 trailers around, ya know? You should probably stop typing though or you'll be short on your 2000 trailers for this year since you'd have to change trailers every 2 hours (that includes hook up and disconect).

              Your probably the first person I've heard of useing a grand as a commercial vehicle.
              Last edited by adventure bob; 09-08-2005, 01:55 PM.

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              • #8
                hey bob, before the comments read the post carefully. i manage a large marina, and i did not say i tow with a grand cherokee. i tow with a 2500 chevy truck. i do know people that use grand cherokees at other marinas. and there are days i tow up to 20 a day. if you want to help out a little let me know, ill give you directions to get here.

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                • #9
                  Ahh so you don't tow 2000 trailers a year you move them around your marina with a 2500 pickup which is considerably longer than a GC and you're not experiencing any real highway conditions such as wind off the mountains or semis going past at 80 or breaking on a steep grade at 50MPH. And as you state in your post, which I read, your experience with towing things behind a GC is secondary from your customers. My point is that you don't know because you don't do it. So please don't pass yourself off like you do.

                  I tow a horse trailer or a flatbed with my wrangler on it over 10K a year with my GC in real life towing conditions. I have some practical real world experience with a GC and actually towing things behind it.

                  Basic physics here my man, length matters.

                  A pickle isn’t a bicycle so please don’t come in here making those kinds of comparisons. If you haven't done it guess what your experience level is?

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                  • #10
                    again, READ BEFORE YOU COMMENT. tell me where i said i move them around a marina? you have lots of BS comments for someone that doesnt read before you respond. i tow on average of 50000 miles a year.

                    start from the first post and go from there. length does not have the large effect you think it does if the trailer is properly weighted and balanced. its very simple. anyone that tows anything regularly can tell you that. yes it is longer, you do have more overall length, it will handle differently. actually, since you tow a lot you would know that a longer trailer is generally easier to tow than a short little 10 footer. if properly loaded it will always sway less, backs up easier and is easier to control overall going down the road. as far as stopping goes you are assuming a larger trailer will weigh more than a smaller one which is not always true. however if it does you need to be conscious of that, that is common sense. if you dont know that you shouldnt hook up anything to the back of your vehicle, and frankly about half the people that tow things definitely should not because they dont have that common sense.

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                    • #11
                      Too much conterversay(spelling); I'll just stay at a Super 8

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                      • #12
                        hey lets make this easy look in your owners manuel it should answer this question. if not Ive seen lots of people pull pop ups and several with tandem axel campers Iwould recomend the eletric breaks and i would not go over 16 foot in length. Also make sure you get a hitch that is at the correct height for the trailer it should ride level this will help with the handeling on the toe vehicle. As for the sway bars I use the load leveling type and they are great.BIG difference w/wo them. sorry no pissn match here.

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                        • #13
                          scott, you are absolutely correct. you have to use common sense. im not saying you should pull a 30 foot trailer with a jeep. im just saying that you can pull something more than 10 feet and not have to be worried about it.

                          i have enough of this topic. next...

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                          • #14
                            whoa. calm down guys. since i'm nuetral, i'll tell you what i've learned from everyone. 1st, carefully balance everything on the trailer. 2nd, length does matter but not as much as you'd think. i'm not trying to stand up for anyone; i don't tow; i'm just telling what sounds the best from the most that i've seen in this forum.

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                            • #15
                              Brian is correct.

                              I tow 3 different trailers with a Cherokee (shorter wheelbase) a total of about 3000 miles a year. Each trails differently.

                              I have a 10 ft utility trailer which tows like a brick.

                              A 14 ft dual horse trailer which when loaded goes about 4500 lbs and tows like a dream (except for the uphill grunt).

                              An 18 ft boat & trailer which weighs about 3200 lbs, which used to tow nicely until I put a 3" lift on my XJ.

                              The key to all of them is tongue weight. You don't have enough, they sway like a yo-yo and bounce around. Anything over 1000 lbs really, really needs some kind of breaking. I've even upgraded my rear brakes to disc and has added a large comfort margin to towing (especially when backing up downhill).

                              Since my XJ came with a factory towing package, the factory felt a sway bar was not needed and unless you lift your vehicle, you don't. With my 3" lift I put a sway bar on and the longer trailer no longer sways.

                              Also make sure your safety chains are rated for the load you are carrying. I've seen a few break away from the vehicle because the owner felt a dog chain looked safe.

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