Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Charging a car battery Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Charging a car battery

    ok guys. my mom left her lights on on her car last night even though they always turn off on their own. i was about to go to school (in my jeep) when she couldn't get her car started. soooooooo, despite what was right in my eyes (she has another car: a 1970 VW karmann ghia) i let her drive mine. oh no. i found out that i am a VERY jealous driver when it comes to my zj. but that's not what im asking. i've never charged a car and so i want to know what all i need to do. i already have the jumper cables. should i charge from mine to hers? anything i need to do before? risks? etc. just how would you guys do it. in case it matters, she has an 05 chevy equinox 4 banger i think

  • #2
    turn the cherokee on, attach red clamp to red (positive) battery knob thing, black clamp to black (negetive) battery knob thing on the jeep, then repeat on the chevy. dont let the clamps touch each other when theyre attached to the battery before you connect them to the other battery. http://www.myfordfocus.com/images/ho...atteryjump.gif
    Last edited by deerhntr20; 12-09-2005, 12:35 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      ok but what is 4 hooked onto and what is the negative wire going to dead battery?

      Comment


      • #4
        screw "4" just hook it to negative on the dead battery
        Last edited by deerhntr20; 12-09-2005, 12:42 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          The diagram is indicating that the #4 be hooked to vehicle ground from the donor battery since the dead batter is already hooked to ground. Sometimes it is easier to get a good "clamp" to engine ground that try to connect it on the battery.

          Most of the time just run the cables direct batter to battery. Red to red, black to black or + to + and - to -.

          By the way Tex, I really don't know if I would actually "charge" the dead battery this way, but charge it just enough so the vehicle will start. Then, let the vehicle charge its battery on it's own. While modern charging systems are far better than they used to be, if there is something bad in the dead battery or a draw down somewhere in the vehicle, you could potentially damage your alternator.

          Comment


          • #6
            so what y'all are sayin is: run battery to battery for about say... 10 minutes? then turn it off. and does the battery recharge on it's own when the engine runs because of a tiny generator or something? also, is there a certain battery or clip i need to start with?

            Comment


            • #7
              After connecting the cables.

              Dead Car Starting Method # 1: Preferred method of starting the dead battery
              Try this method before you try Method #2. It's critically important to shut off the boosting car抯 engine during the moments of actual cranking of the car with the dead battery. This does however reduce available power to the dead car because the boosting car's alternator isn't running, Doug has had a number of "live" boosts make the boosting car's alternator diodes either fail outright or die very prematurely from the extreme current draw on the alternator while cranking the engine on the bad car. So the safest method is to have the good engine running a few minutes to charge the dead battery. Then shut off the good car's engine and disconnect the cables and start the bad car's engine. This method does not always work, so if Method #1 does not work for you, try Method #2. Personally, I've never had a problem with Method #2, but the risk is there. I still think the best thing for you to use if your car is near a source of AC current, is a home car battery charger/jumper. In the Method #1 above, I might add that if you keep trying to crank the bad car and it won't start, then stop this process before you drain the good car's battery. You don't want 2 dead car batteries on your hands. You may need to start the good car's engine and proceed with original method.


              Dead Car Starting Method # 2: Gentlemen, Start Your Engines!
              Start the good car's engine, and make sure the headlights are off, to allow the maximum amount of power to get to the dead battery. Let the good car's engine run a minute or so before attempting to start the dead car. Sometimes you get lucky and the dead battery will jump start right away, sometimes it takes a few minutes. If you're lucky and have a voltmeter built into your dash on the dead car, turn the key to the accessory setting and read the voltage coming into your charging system. Ideally you want between 12 and 13.6 volts, but some cars can start at 10 volts. If your dead car's interior dome light comes on, it's a great sign that you've connected the cables right. Now shut all doors and dome lights and try to start the car. If it sounds like it's trying to crank but won't turn over completely, give it a few more minutes and rev the engine moderately on the good car. You may also need to play with the cable grips to get a better connection, and use that in dash voltmeter to its fullest if you have one. You'll get a spark as you move the cables around a bit. Let's assume your engine started ok, but if it did not start, see the troubleshooting section further down this page.

              Removing the jumper cables
              Now that your dead car has been successfully jump started, you can remove the cables in the reverse order that you connected them:
              1. Disconnect the Negative (-) cable from the engine block of the car that was jump started.
              2. Disconnect the other end of the Negative (-) cable from the Negative (-) post of the good battery.
              3. Disconnect the Positive (+) cable from the Positive (+) post of the good battery.
              4. Disconnect the other end of the Positive (+) cable from the Positive (+) post of the dead battery.
              See if your car can restart on its own now
              Here's a test I do every time I jump start a car. After your revived car has been running a few minutes, turn off the engine and see if it will restart on its own, no cables attached. This is a good test to see if your charging system is working, and if successful, it's a good indicator that you won't have problems driving home. If the engine cannot crank on it's own, you'll have to jump start the car again and it may mean you'll have problems getting home. If your alternator is not putting out 13.6 volts, it means the battery is not charging. Turn on the headlights and if you have an in-dash voltmeter, see if it drops below 12 volts. Also press the brake pedal and see if the voltage drops, or if your dome lights dim. If it drops down to 10 volts, you may have a lot of trouble on the way home, in the form of your car stalling again when you hit the brakes. Sometimes if your alternator is in such bad shape, and can't put out even 12 volts after jump starting just pressing the brake pedal and illuminating the rear brake lights is enough to cause the car to stall. If your car does not restart on its own, it's a good sign that something is really wrong, either the battery, or your charging system.

              Troubleshooting Tips
              You tried the steps above and your car still won't start. Possible causes might be the dead battery is not getting voltage from the good battery due to bad cables, or the most common reason: a bad connection from good battery cables. Having a cheap voltmeter solves this problem in 2 seconds.
              • Measure the voltage across the dead battery posts and if it's less than 12 volts, play with the cables a bit to be sure you get a good connection. You'll see sparking as you adjust the clamps, which is normal. You may hear the other car's engine slow down a bit which is a good sign that your battery is now taking the charge from the other car. But you can see the usefulness of having a voltmeter when a battery can't be jump started.
              • As a last resort, try disconnecting the Negative (-) cable from the dead car's engine block, and try moving it over to the Ground (-) post of the dead battery, if the dead battery is super clean and not leaking. Keep in mind there is always risk of battery explosion, but I've never had a problem. Wear protective eyewear! Don't be stupid! Don't take any chances. You'll sometimes get a better ground connection to the battery by clamping right to the (-) post instead of the engine block, but the engine block is safer. Be sure you are wearing eye and face protection in case the battery disagrees with your strategy. Remember, if you don't see your known instrument panel light up, or you working dome light turn on, then you don't have a good jumper cable connection.
              • Try another set of cables. It could be the cables you're using are no longer any good.
              • Verify once again that all appliances are off. Nothing should be on, the door should be closed during the cranking process so the dome light cannot come on, wasting precious battery voltage while trying to start.
              • Double check that there is no corrosion, rust, paint, or anything other than nice shiny metal on the battery contact posts. Any corrosion acts like a big resistor, and prevents the voltage from getting through the jumper cables to the dead battery. Scrape off the corrosion with a fingernail file if you have to, but you want nice shiny posts when you're done.
              • If the cables are real warm and you're not having success, it's a sign that your cables have a problem. If they warm up, it means there's too much resistance in the line. There should be very little cable resistance. If the cables are frayed or rusty at the clamps they won't work.
              • It could be your starter is bad and won't turn over. It could also be a short circuit in the output voltage regulator of your charging circuit, or your electronic ignition could be bad. When an electronic ignition dies, there is no warning it just shuts off, and can appear to be a dead battery. In either case, you'll probably need to get towed, because the engine will never start under these conditions. But if you know that you just left the headlights on and drained down your battery, then it's probably is just the battery.
              • If all else fails, call a friend with cables, a tow truck, or AAA. If you have an extended warranty like the popular Warranty Direct, or 1SourceAutoWarranty, call the number in your policy booklet and take advantage of the roadside assistance included as part of your extended warranty benefits. Most people forget that their extended warranty has this benefit. Not all warranties have it, but many do.

              Comment


              • #8
                Just jump it...

                Originally posted by Tex
                so what y'all are sayin is: run battery to battery for about say... 10 minutes? then turn it off. and does the battery recharge on it's own when the engine runs because of a tiny generator or something? also, is there a certain battery or clip i need to start with?
                I think starch covered it while I was typing...
                Last edited by blackwater; 12-09-2005, 03:23 PM. Reason: rstarch

                Comment


                • #9
                  Tex, do you have a cell phone with free long distance? You can call me if you want, and I'll walk you through it. Just have cables first. If ya gotta buy some, get a heavy cable(#6or better cause they will last a lifetime). Then call if you want. I'll pm my cell number.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    if he has a cell phone he should call AAA.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X