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  • You Might Not Ever Guess

    Captain Kangaroo passed away on January 23, 2004 as age 76 , which is odd, because he always looked to be 76. (DOB: 6/27/27) His death reminded me of the following story.
    Attachment
    Some people have been a bit offended that the actor, Lee Marvin, is buried in a grave alongside 3 and 4 star generals at Arlington National Cemetery. His marker gives his name, rank (PVT) and service (USMC). Nothing else. Here's a guy who was only a famous movie star who served his time, why the heck does he rate burial with these guys? Well, following is the amazing answer:
    I always liked Lee Marvin, but didn't know the extent of his Marine Corps experiences.
    In a time when many Hollywood stars served their country in the armed forces often in rear echelon posts where they were carefully protected, only to be trotted out to perform for the cameras in war bond promotions,
    Lee Marvin was a genuine hero. He won the Navy Cross at Iwo Jima. There is only one higher award... the Congressional Medal Of Honor.
    If that is a surprising comment on the true character of the man, he credits his sergeant with an even greater show of bravery.

    Dialog from "The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson": His guest was Lee Marvin. Johnny said, "Lee, I'll bet a lot of people are unaware that you were a Marine in the initial landing at Iwo Jima...and that during the course of that action you earned the Navy Cross and were severely wounded."
    "Yeah, yeah... I got shot square in the bottom and they gave me the Cross for securing a hot spot about halfway up Suribachi. Bad thing about getting shot up on a mountain is guys getting' shot hauling you down. But,Johnny, at Iwo I served under the bravest man I ever knew... We both got the cross the same day, but what he did for his Cross made mine look cheap in comparison. That dumb guy actually stood up on Red beach and directed his troops to move forward and get the hell off the beach. Bullets flying by, with mortar rounds landing everywhere and he stood there as the main target of gunfire so that he could get his men to safety. He did this on more than one occasion because his men's safety was more important than his own life.
    That Sergeant and I have been lifelong friends. When they brought me off Suribachi we passed the Sergeant and he lit a smoke and passed it to me, lying on my belly on the litter and said, where'd they get you Lee?' Well Bob... if you make it home before me, tell Mom to sell the outhouse!"
    Johnny, I'm not lying, Sergeant Keeshan was the bravest man I ever knew.
    The Sergeant's name is Bob Keeshan. You and the world know him as Captain Kangaroo."
    Attachment
    On another note, there was this wimpy little man (who just passed away) on PBS, gentle and quiet. Mr. Rogers is another of those you would least suspect of being anything but what he now portrays to our youth. But Mr. Rogers was a U.S. Navy Seal, combat-proven in Vietnam with over twenty-five confirmed kills to his name. He wore a long-sleeved sweater on TV, to cover the many tattoos on his forearm and biceps. He was a master in small arms and hand-to-hand combat, able to disarm or kill in a heartbeat.

    After the war Mr. Rogers became an ordained Presbyterian minister and therefore a pacifist. Vowing to never harm another human and also dedicating the rest of his life to trying to help lead children on the right path in life. He hid away the tattoos and his past life and won our hearts with his quiet wit and charm.
    America's real heroes don't flaunt what they did; they quietly go about their day-to-day lives, doing what they do best. They earned our respect and the freedoms that we all enjoy.
    Look around and see if you can find one of those heroes in your midst.
    Often, they are the ones you'd least suspect, but would most like to have on your side if anything ever happened.
    Take the time to thank anyone that has fought for our freedom. With encouragement they could be the next Captain Kangaroo or Mr.Rogers.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by tomsjeep; 05-12-2006, 01:25 PM.

  • #2
    That was very interresting. Thanks

    Comment


    • #3
      or...

      Originally posted by tomsjeep
      ...Take the time to thank anyone that has fought for our freedom. With encouragement they could be the next Captain Kangaroo or Mr.Rogers.
      “Reconnaissance of 'Heartbreak Ridge" after its capture revealed why it had been so hard to take. Hill 931 itself was the center peak of three that were within small arms range of each other. While continuing to hold it the enemy could put down well aimed and observed fire on the neighboring two peaks. But what added even more to its strength for the North Korean defenders was the fact that its slope on the eastern side facing the 2d Division troops was rocky and almost perpendicular for the last 250 to 300 yards. Ascent by foot troops was necessarily slow. On the reverse or western side, the slope was less steep and was of dirt. Into this slope, the enemy had dug his many bunkers of such strength as to resist even a direct hit from our 105 mm howitzers. These bunkers, only twenty five to thirty five yards from the topographical crest of the hill, were numerous enough to provide complete protection to some 400 to 500 men. During artillery or air bombardments, the enemy troops would leave their entrenchments and communications trenches on the crest for the protection of their strong bunkers. Yet, when the artillery or air attacks were lifted, they had ample time to return to their positions before our troops could scale the last very steep and rocky 200 to 300 yards on the attacking side.”

      Or, they work in the storeroom in a power plant. I worked with John for many years. I saw him everyday until he retired about five years ago. He was a lot older than me but I never saw him or see him (he still comes out at times and helps us during spring and fall outages) that he doesn’t have a smile and a handshake ready. About two years ago I was standing at the storeroom counter talking to him about some of our guys who were Sandbox bound. Out of the blue he says, ‘I fought at Heartbreak Ridge’. Well, I didn’t think I heard him right so I say, ‘What did you say, John?’ He repeated himself, ‘I fought at Heartbreak Ridge and my best friend was blown to bits not two feet away from me.’ I said, ‘I never knew you were in the service.’ He said, ‘I don’t talk about it much. I don’t really know why I just said that to you.’

      For all I know this man has the Congressional Medal of Honor in a drawer somewhere at home. He’s humble, he’s polite, he’s an all around great guy and he’s a hero of the first order.

      Oh, and I loved Captain Kangaroo.

      Comment


      • #4
        www.snopes.com/military/marvin.asp

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by tomsjeep
          [FONT=Arial][SIZE=2][FONT=Arial]
          On another note, there was this wimpy little man (who just passed away) on PBS, gentle and quiet. Mr. Rogers is another of those you would least suspect of being anything but what he now portrays to our youth. But Mr. Rogers was a U.S. Navy Seal, combat-proven in Vietnam with over twenty-five confirmed kills to his name. He wore a long-sleeved sweater on TV, to cover the many tattoos on his forearm and biceps. He was a master in small arms and hand-to-hand combat, able to disarm or kill in a heartbeat.

          After the war Mr. Rogers became an ordained Presbyterian minister and therefore a pacifist. Vowing to never harm another human and also dedicating the rest of his life to trying to help lead children on the right path in life. He hid away the tattoos and his past life and won our hearts with his quiet wit and charm.
          America's real heroes don't flaunt what they did; they quietly go about their day-to-day lives, doing what they do best. They earned our respect and the freedoms that we all enjoy.
          Look around and see if you can find one of those heroes in your midst.
          Often, they are the ones you'd least suspect, but would most like to have on your side if anything ever happened.
          Take the time to thank anyone that has fought for our freedom. With encouragement they could be the next Captain Kangaroo or Mr.Rogers.
          Actually, Mr Rogers never spent a day in the military. But great story anyway. Bob Ross (the happy painter) WAS a marine sniper. Mr. Roger nor John Denver were ever in the military.

          Comment


          • #6
            When I was stationed at Fort Stewart, GA, I met a Doctor that was one of the original members of the SEALs, called a plank owner. He told me he knew Richard Marcinko and Mr. Rogers in Vietnam and that he, Rogers, was one he!! of a sniper too. I don't how true this is but the doc told me the only person to have more kills as a sniper than Rogers was Carlos Hath**** Jr. Very interesting these Vets are.

            Comment


            • #7
              I cannot vouch for the truth of this...
              it was sent me by the retired Sergeant Major that sits next to me in the office, and I was moved to share.
              At any rate, it's a swell story.

              Comment


              • #8
                dang...

                Captain Kangaroo is STILL a hero...

                And I believe John. He's sort of like one of those guys that reminds you of your dad. (Believe me, those don't come along often for me.)

                Or, maybe he should just be an Oscar winning actor...

                Hell, it's Friday... let's have a brewskie!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by texascj
                  When I was stationed at Fort Stewart, GA, I met a Doctor that was one of the original members of the SEALs, called a plank owner. He told me he knew Richard Marcinko and Mr. Rogers in Vietnam and that he, Rogers, was one he!! of a sniper too. I don't how true this is but the doc told me the only person to have more kills as a sniper than Rogers was Carlos Hath**** Jr. Very interesting these Vets are.
                  The Truth
                  Fred Rogers, the founder and host of the popular U.S. children's television program Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood never served in the military.
                  There have been various false rumors about him including one that claims he always wore long-sleeved shirts to hide his tattoo.

                  According to his official biography from Family Communications, the producers of his show, Fred Rogers went directly from college into media.
                  He was first hired as an assistant producer by NBC television in New York and worked on several classic shows such as The Voice of Firestone, The Kate Smith Hour, and The NBC Opera Theatre.
                  He was asked to help develop some of the first programming for WQED in Pittsburgh, the nation's first community-sponsored educational television station.
                  Some of what he created was children's programming that eventually led to Mr. Rogers Neighborhood.

                  Rogers' major in college was Music Composition but he later attended both Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and the University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Child Development and was ordained a Presbyterian minister in 1963.

                  He died on February 27, 2003 at his home in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

                  Also, Richard Marcinko is a self inflated, big headed, blow hard who thinks the world revolves around him. That is why he was "asked to leave" the SEALS. I wanted to puke after reading a few chapters of his first book.

                  I know it is hard to believe "some dude" on an internet chat room. There are many people that spew a lot of B.S., but please believe me on this one. I was okay until Marcinko came up...he just really gets under my skin. What an a$$.

                  Good call Blackwater...I'll have that beer now!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    i really enjoy Marcinko books. but then again, i also like the movie Hostel and the Saw movies. maybe there is somehting wrong with me.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Two things...

                      1) The doc said the same thing about Marcinko that you just did.

                      2) Did you ever have a show that was so good you would absolutely drop what you were doing to watch it? That's what CPT Kangaroo was to me when I was little. Even today, his show is an example that should be followed by todays shows and life in general. I am a little bit better person today because of CPT Kangaroo yesterday.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by texascj
                        Did you ever have a show that was so good you would absolutely drop what you were doing to watch it? That's what CPT Kangaroo was to me when I was little. Even today, his show is an example that should be followed by todays shows and life in general. I am a little bit better person today because of CPT Kangaroo yesterday.
                        CPT Kangaroo was not in my childhood library. I never watched him, or I don't remember. I do remember having a daily diet of Mr. Rogers. I think both of them were the last vestages of great programing. Instead we have cartoons beating up each other, belching, farting, and being rude in general (or have a big purple dinosaur...gay?). I still sit down and watch Mr. Rogers with my kids when I can.

                        Comment

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