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  • #31
    Grrr....I let it sit all night, woke up and it was still cloudy looking. Sanded it down with 500 to take off a couple layers. Sprayed again with base, then clear, and the clear is cloudy again, is there a defect with the paint? This is the first time this is happening or I'd think I was doing something wrong. The only kicker is that I've used two different cans of spray paint so I don't think theres anythig wrong with the paint. I'm almost at wits end....Only one door, windsheild frame and the hood to go.. I'll get it figured out eventually...

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    • #32
      The hazy clear coat is either humidity (try heating up the to-be-painted surface first... sitting in the sunlight for a while for example) or the undercoat not fully dry yet. Likely cure is same... most lacquer production sites heat up the work and then hot dry the finished product.
      You could try a hair dryer on your work to see if that makes any difference.

      Are you sure undercoat and clear topcoat are compatible? Really sure? I'm wondering about that with the results you're getting.

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      • #33
        Second thought... how thick are you putting the clearcoat on?
        I did have (one time, when I was doing a high-build finish) an item get all cloudy like you describe from too thick a coat. It did clear after sitting in the sunlight for a while (couple of days).

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        • #34
          I sprayed it on kinda thick, thats the way I want the clear on, in thick coats, usually it would turn cloudy right when I sprayed it, but went away after drying. Now it's just staying cloudy (check out the picture on my profile). I'll give it a couple days and see what happens. I didn't relize how big of a project the hood is. It's very hard to match up all the textures of clear, almost impossible with such a big piece. I just worked two days (10 hour days) on one door and the hood, and I still don't have the hood the way I want it. Frustating..Any pointers with spraying such a big object, overspray is killing me....

          At least I have one door done, and it looks good too. (check out pic on my profile)
          Last edited by Alaskanbadfish; 07-22-2009, 01:38 AM.

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          • #35
            I have sprayed a lot of things with cans and it can look really good.

            First, take your time. Don't expect complete coverage with the first pass, as a matter of fact if you do get it...you are doing it wrong. Many thin layers are far better then one big thick layer.

            Second, start a couple inchs off the surface and finish a couple inchs off the surface. Get one of the trigger adaptors for sure and think of it as an actual paint gun. Pull the trigger and then sweep across the item, when you have reached the other side over shoot it and let go of the trigger. Never pull the trigger with the tip over the object, this will leave you with a thick spot.

            Third, when you are done with a coat flip the can over and srapy it a few times till it sprays clear. This will keep the tip from getting clogged and should help you keep a smooth flow.

            Hope this helps.

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            • #36
              When I'm applying the clear, I like to spray until I see the surface get wet. Is this right, or wrong? Should I just kinda let the spray cloud settle on the area, like misting it. This seems like there would make a lot of dust and overspray. I was spraying yesterday after tack-clothing the entire area. After going for about 60 seconds I looked at the surrounding areas again and they where covered in dust once again, I'm assuming this is overspray, do I just continue to paint over that as I'm making my passes? Clear coat is really hard to figure out (on larger areas), I figure I'll be the clear coat master when all is said and done.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Alaskanbadfish View Post
                When I'm applying the clear, I like to spray until I see the surface get wet. Is this right, or wrong? Should I just kinda let the spray cloud settle on the area, like misting it. This seems like there would make a lot of dust and overspray. I was spraying yesterday after tack-clothing the entire area. After going for about 60 seconds I looked at the surrounding areas again and they where covered in dust once again, I'm assuming this is overspray, do I just continue to paint over that as I'm making my passes? Clear coat is really hard to figure out (on larger areas), I figure I'll be the clear coat master when all is said and done.
                That's too thick.
                That's the same way my piece got into trouble.
                And yes, you will be the master.
                (Obi-Wan we can start calling you?)

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                • #38
                  So I do just want to mist it on? Won't the overspray kill my project? Should I just work on a small piece at a time and mask off the rest? If I mask off the other areas how would I not have "lines" form from where I mask it off?

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                  • #39
                    I used to use a 'floating mask' (cardboard, tape and whatever else handy that works) that was an inch or so off the work surface to yield a soft edge.

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                    • #40
                      then after my paint dries, take and sand the rough surfaces left on the edges, and move on? I think I may be getting somewhere.

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                      • #41
                        At this stage in the finishing, I would not sand until just before the final coat. This presumes the sanding should only be minor - a super fine wet sanding to make certain everything's nice and smooth, and then hit it with a top coat and leave it.

                        Are we having any fun yet?

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                        • #42
                          Alright tonight I'm trying to do an area and masking off the rest, I'm just hoping that there won't be any visible lines or different patterns noticable. I guess we'll see. I'm doing 3 light coats, and one medium coat to finish.

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                          • #43
                            Yer keepin the spray can industry afloat.
                            Sure it wouldn't have been cheaper to just take it someplace and have it painted?

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                            • #44
                              cheapest quote I got: $2800.00
                              15 cans base @ $4.95 = $74.25
                              20 cans Clear @ $4.95 = $99.00
                              various sanding discs = $25.00
                              10 Tack rags @ $1.99 = $19.90
                              6 cans primer @ $5.79 = $34.74

                              One hell of a high and a headache the next day = PRICELESS

                              Total to date = $252.89

                              Lets just make it an even $300.00

                              With all the elbow grease I'd say roughly 100 Man Hours I think it would be safe to say --I love my Jeep!!

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                              • #45
                                paint the whole door all at once with a nice even coat of paint, no particular pattern, no long straight lines. do several full coatings ten minutes apart. it's that or one thick coat, but ya gotta have skills to pull that off right without drips.

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