Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
What was the last thing you read? Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What was the last thing you read?

    Well, I didn

  • #2
    I have been reading the books that the legend of the seeker was based off of. The tv show was horrible but books rock. terry Goodkind is the author. I have read the wizards first rule, stone of tears and am currently working on the blood of the fold. The books are about a your woods guide that ends up finding out he is a wizard and is destined to be the seeker of truth. He go's on to find out his real father was a is a tyrant wizard that is dealing with the keeper of the underworld.

    Comment


    • #3
      "Truce at Bakura". Star Wars novel that picks up the day after the last movie where the second Death Star was blown up. I'm kinda hooked on the stupid things. I actually started Brad Meltzer's "Inner Circle" first, but broke down and grabbed this one for some quick reading.

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, obviously the last thing I read was Gryphon's post!

        Comment


        • #5
          Guns of the South...no real reason, but the thought of Civil War Confederates with AK47's was quite intriguing.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hmm, just finished Health Differences Across the Life Span 2 last week and just started Health Differences Across the Life Span 3.

            This is for my Nursing Degree, so yea, fun stuff...

            Comment


            • #7
              american way mag from american airlines.
              best I got

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 88 Sahara View Post
                Guns of the South...no real reason, but the thought of Civil War Confederates with AK47's was quite intriguing.
                That's a great book, Sahara. I read it years ago and haven't forgotten how the topic was treated. The author had great respect for General Lee (as do I). I just finished a book about the first black film maker in America, Oscar Micheaux. It was a fascinating biography that should be required reading for many in today's America. Micheaux struggled against near insurmountable odds but did not know the meaning of the word 'quit'.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Obviously it wasn't this thread, since it tool me a month to find it!

                  "The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors" - James D. Hornfischer... a true story of the U.S. Navy's engagement at Leyte Gulf in WW2 (my father was a participant in this action, and was injured during aircraft launch and recovery operations).
                  Definitely worth a read, as historians and strategists are still argueing about how the U.S. Navy's "Taffy 3" (the radio call signal for Task Unit 77.4.3; my father was aboard escort carrier U.S.S Rudyerd Bay in "Taffy 1") group of 6 escort carriers, 3 destroyers and 4 destroyer escorts threw themselves at a Japanese task force consisting of 4 battleships, 6 heavy cruisers, 2 light cruisers plus destroyers and drove them off. Any single battleship in the Japanese force outgunned all of the ships of Taffy 3. When all was over, the U.S. Navy lost 2 escort carriers, 2 destroyers, and 1 destroyer escort. The Japanese lost more than just ships (3 heavy cruisers sunk, 3 more seriously damaged, 1 destroyer sunk, 1 seriously damaged), they also lost the initiative - the Japanese Navy would never again present a challenge to the U.S. fleet. One report reads "Due to the ferocity of the U.S. attacks, Kurita was convinced that he was facing a far superior force and withdrew from the battle, ending the threat to the troop transports and supply ships."
                  This piece of World War II naval history reads like a particularly good novel. It is an account of the October 1944 battle off Samar, in which a force of American destroyers and escort carriers drove off a Japanese fleet at least 10 times its strength. The struggle was a part of the epic Battle of Leyte Gulf, which was the beginning of the campaign to liberate the Philippines. Hornfischer focuses on the men of the escort carrier unit Taffy 3 (the radio call signal for Task Unit 77.4.3 --easy to see why it is the preferred designation), who fought, flew, and fired to nearly the last shell in a battle that at least one commander commenced by saying, "Survival cannot be expected." Readable from beginning to end, this popular history magnificently brings to life men and times that may seem almost as remote as Trafalgar to many in the early twenty-first century. Of especial interest are its account of the process that turned civilians into sailors, and its carrying forward of those sailors' stories to the handful of aging survivors still gathering in commemoration today. One of the finest World War II volumes to appear in years. Frieda Murray
                  Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

                  Had the U.S. Navy lost this engagement, nothing could have prevented the Japanese Navy from coming amidst the troop and supply ships making the landing in the Phillipines. It would have been a disaster, loss of ships and an entire Army Corps, MacArthur's command structure, and a huge morale loss for the nation. Worth a read. Absolutely awe-inspiring when you consider what some of those little destroyers did... one of them (later sunk) decided that the safest place for it would be right between 2 Japanese warships, where their guns could not depress low enough to shoot them. Kind of a gutsy move in my book.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X